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There is no fence, no barrier at all, just a curtain of trees.

Right now, they're catching all the dumb people. They'll never get you if you're doing it properly."Top 10 Marijuana Myths and Facts Smugglers have buried stashes in semi trucks filled with wood chips and driven across the border.

"He was one of those guys everybody used to pick on," says his friend Scuzz - Ben Scozzaro, a year ahead of Nate at Coeur D' Alene High. That's what we used to call him, actually." Nor was Nate much of a scholar.

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One night, Topher stumbled across a DEA agent, asleep in his truck; another time, they got lost and nearly froze to death when the temperature dropped to fourteen below zero.

Nate and his friends were suddenly making – and spending – preposterous amounts of money.

The oldest of four children, Nate became especially protective of his mother.

Despite his academic shortcomings, he was always a hard worker, his string of shitty day jobs including paper routes, telemarketing gigs and a stint at the Taco John at the mall."Nathaniel has always been a really good kid," insists his mother, Teresia Franks. There was an old lady who lived across the street from us. Bud is really Chronic," says Scuzz, who had been brought on board as a dealer. But when you're making twenty or thirty grand a week, why the fuck would you stop?

Hikers, snowboarders and potheads come to Nelson from all over the continent to openly smoke weed and to buy one of the various strains of B. Bud, christened with brand names for marketing purposes: Triple-A, Crystal Globe, SIN/D. Aside from Scuzz, there was Topher's friend Tim Hunt, a nineteen-year-old whose family had moved to Coeur D' Alene from Alaska after his father, caught poaching moose, committed suicide; Scuzz's best friend, Rhett Mayer, a supersmart kid who never touched weed but began driving scout cars en route to the border; and Nate's buddy Dustin Lauer, ironically nicknamed "the Rock" because he was five-foot-six and chubby but always tried to be a tough guy. "Nate did it a couple of times, just for fun," says Topher.

or some stupid shit a list of the highest-stress jobs. "He'd drink four Red Bulls and be darting from tree to tree like a crazy guy."Topher remained the head runner, paid a flat fee of

or some stupid shit a list of the highest-stress jobs. "He'd drink four Red Bulls and be darting from tree to tree like a crazy guy."Topher remained the head runner, paid a flat fee of $1,000 per crossing. The crew was immediately outfitted with hundreds of dollars' worth of equipment, everything from new boots to night-vision goggles to a spray, purchased on the Internet, that was supposed to make them "invisible" to heat sensors.And yet The Idea had more legs than your typical pot-inspired idea.It did not involve a 's Special Coverage of Marijuana in America At the time, Nate was a nineteen-year-old high school dropout who worked at a Pizza Hut in Coeur D' Alene - a gorgeous but dull resort town in Idaho - and sold the occasional dime bag on the side. Nate had never been the type to come up with a million-dollar brainstorm.They have dug a 360-foot tunnel, beginning in a Quonset hut in Canada and ending in the living room of a home in Lynden, Washington.They drag their stashes underwater, behind fishing boats, so the line can be cut if an agent approaches; buoys, attached to the loads with dissolvable strips of zinc, rise to the surface the following day.Her drive-way would get blocked every time the snowplow would go by. Once safely on American soil, the pair met their friends at an Outback Steakhouse and, in Topher's words, "ate like starving coyotes." Excited by the success of their first outing, they showed their friends the weed – which was, they all had to admit, fairly skunk-looking tourist weed. "This was like Cali Mexican weed."aving doubled their initial investment in roughly a day, Nate and Topher quickly planned a second run. Before they knew it, they had gone from struggling to put gas in their cars to running a major pot enterprise that was bringing in thousands of dollars a day. "Marijuana's Big Moment As business boomed, the guys found a couple of steady suppliers from Nelson – a town that Drew Edwards, in his book calls "the marijuana-culture capital of North America." Nelson's remoteness makes it ideal terrain for pot growers – so much so that the town of 10,000 has its own currency exchange.

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or some stupid shit a list of the highest-stress jobs. "He'd drink four Red Bulls and be darting from tree to tree like a crazy guy."Topher remained the head runner, paid a flat fee of $1,000 per crossing. The crew was immediately outfitted with hundreds of dollars' worth of equipment, everything from new boots to night-vision goggles to a spray, purchased on the Internet, that was supposed to make them "invisible" to heat sensors.

And yet The Idea had more legs than your typical pot-inspired idea.

It did not involve a 's Special Coverage of Marijuana in America At the time, Nate was a nineteen-year-old high school dropout who worked at a Pizza Hut in Coeur D' Alene - a gorgeous but dull resort town in Idaho - and sold the occasional dime bag on the side. Nate had never been the type to come up with a million-dollar brainstorm.

They have dug a 360-foot tunnel, beginning in a Quonset hut in Canada and ending in the living room of a home in Lynden, Washington.

They drag their stashes underwater, behind fishing boats, so the line can be cut if an agent approaches; buoys, attached to the loads with dissolvable strips of zinc, rise to the surface the following day.

Her drive-way would get blocked every time the snowplow would go by. Once safely on American soil, the pair met their friends at an Outback Steakhouse and, in Topher's words, "ate like starving coyotes." Excited by the success of their first outing, they showed their friends the weed – which was, they all had to admit, fairly skunk-looking tourist weed. "This was like Cali Mexican weed."aving doubled their initial investment in roughly a day, Nate and Topher quickly planned a second run. Before they knew it, they had gone from struggling to put gas in their cars to running a major pot enterprise that was bringing in thousands of dollars a day. "Marijuana's Big Moment As business boomed, the guys found a couple of steady suppliers from Nelson – a town that Drew Edwards, in his book calls "the marijuana-culture capital of North America." Nelson's remoteness makes it ideal terrain for pot growers – so much so that the town of 10,000 has its own currency exchange.

||

or some stupid shit a list of the highest-stress jobs. "He'd drink four Red Bulls and be darting from tree to tree like a crazy guy."Topher remained the head runner, paid a flat fee of $1,000 per crossing. The crew was immediately outfitted with hundreds of dollars' worth of equipment, everything from new boots to night-vision goggles to a spray, purchased on the Internet, that was supposed to make them "invisible" to heat sensors.

And yet The Idea had more legs than your typical pot-inspired idea.

It did not involve a 's Special Coverage of Marijuana in America At the time, Nate was a nineteen-year-old high school dropout who worked at a Pizza Hut in Coeur D' Alene - a gorgeous but dull resort town in Idaho - and sold the occasional dime bag on the side. Nate had never been the type to come up with a million-dollar brainstorm.

They have dug a 360-foot tunnel, beginning in a Quonset hut in Canada and ending in the living room of a home in Lynden, Washington.

,000 per crossing. The crew was immediately outfitted with hundreds of dollars' worth of equipment, everything from new boots to night-vision goggles to a spray, purchased on the Internet, that was supposed to make them "invisible" to heat sensors.

And yet The Idea had more legs than your typical pot-inspired idea.

It did not involve a 's Special Coverage of Marijuana in America At the time, Nate was a nineteen-year-old high school dropout who worked at a Pizza Hut in Coeur D' Alene - a gorgeous but dull resort town in Idaho - and sold the occasional dime bag on the side. Nate had never been the type to come up with a million-dollar brainstorm.

They have dug a 360-foot tunnel, beginning in a Quonset hut in Canada and ending in the living room of a home in Lynden, Washington.

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